Does "artisan" mean anything?

Does "artisan" mean anything?

Robert Stephany

So what does “artisan” mean? Well we're off to a good start-the word is derived from an Italian  word “artigiano”!  This means a skilled craft worker so an artisan product is something made by that person and in a traditional way by hand.

Does that describe a burger bun or a grilled sandwich sold by Macdonalds a few years ago? You wouldn’t think so but Macdonalds did and Domino’s once launched an ad campaign for its Artisan Pizza.

Isn’t it time to reclaim the word? After all it has a distinct meaning which is useful in differentiating the product from others.

In the world of food and drink these are the characteristics that mark out an artisan product : 

1.it is produced on a small-scale or in small batches. It isn’t mass-produced or farmed on an industrial scale

2.It is made using traditional methods and tools – usually being hand-crafted as opposed to industrially made

3.It is created according to a traditional recipe that may have been around for hundreds of years. Meaning there are very few, if any, modern ingredients. Like preservatives, colourants, sweeteners, thickeners or other chemicals

4.It is made locally, not imported from another country (though this depends on where the distributor or shop for the product is based)

5.It is traceable or is made from traceable ingredients. Establishing provenance is a key aspect of artisan food.

(source Adams & Russell)

If we look at our Visciolata, our Acquavite and our visciola cherries in syrup, all of them pass all of these tests- small scale production, traditional methods, traditional handed down family recipes, all made within a few miles of where the products are grown and all traceable because the Cardinal family own the cherry trees and do their own picking.

Here are the Cardinale family picking and weighing the cherries. We know how hard they work because we have seen them planting the trees, harvesting the fruit and making the products. It is incredibly incredibly hard work and a real labour of love. Indeed it is love they invest in it, not just labour.

In addition to being genuinely artisan our Visciolata, Acquavite and are suitable for vegans and vegetarians and are gluten-free.

So let’s hear it for artisan food and drink and support artisan businesses!

what does “artisan” mean? Let’s start off on the right foot-the word is derived from the Italian “artigiano” meaning a skilled craft worker so an artisan product is something made by that person, something made in a traditional way by hand by a skilled person.

Does that describe a burger bun or a grilled sandwich sold by Macdonalds a few years ago? You wouldn’t think so but Macdonalds did and Domino’s once launched an ad campaign for its Artisan Pizza.

Isn’t it time to reclaim the word? After all it has a distinct meaning which is useful in differentiating the product from others.

In the world of food and drink these are the characteristics that mark out an artisan product :

1.it is produced on a small-scale or in small batches. It isn’t mass-produced or farmed on an industrial scale

2.It is made using traditional methods and tools – usually being hand-crafted as opposed to industrially made

3.It is created according to a traditional recipe that may have been around for hundreds of years. Meaning there are very few, if any, modern ingredients. Like preservatives, colourants, sweeteners, thickeners or other chemicals

4.It is made locally, not imported from another country (though this depends on where the distributor or shop for the product is based)

5.It is traceable or is made from traceable ingredients. Establishing provenance is a key aspect of artisan food.

(source Adams & Russell)

If we look at our Visciolata, our Acquavite and our visciola cherries in syrup, all of them pass all of these tests- small scale production, traditional methods, traditional handed down family recipes, all made within a few miles of where the products are grown and all traceable because the Cardinal family own the cherry trees and do their own picking.

Here are the Cardinale family picking and weighing the cherries. We know how hard they work because we have seen them planting the trees, harvesting the fruit and making the products. It is incredibly incredibly hard work and a real labour of love. Indeed it is love they invest in it, not just labour.

In addition to being genuinely artisan our Visciolata, Acquavite and are suitable for vegans and vegetarians and are gluten-free.

So let’s hear it for artisan food and drink and let's support artisan businesses!



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